New Providence, Nassau, Bahamas – Part I

Apr 17-

We were greeted in the morning by the longtailed tropic birds and Angie was determined to get some kind of photo of them before leaving Shroud Cay.  It took awhile, but at least you can tell they are birds!

Longtailed Tropicbird at Shroud
Longtailed Tropicbird at Shroud

The sail across Exuma Bank was slow, with very light winds.  However, the shades of green water colors were beautiful, and we were graced with the presence of a dolphin!  We have not seen one since the Abacos.

Exuma Bank
Exuma Bank
Shades of Green
Shades of Green
Mark at Helm
Mark at Helm

Dave on Cross Seas was at Highbourne Cay and came out to greet us as he was heading South!  Such a small world!

Mark also used the handheld remote for the autopilot to weave us through the coral head laden shallow Yellow Bank area this time around.

Wireless Autopiloting
Wireless Autopiloting

Angie finished up embroidering flamingo pillow #2 for the cockpit area!

Flamingo Pillow #2
Flamingo Pillow #2

Nassau is an interesting place.  Huge cruise ships come into port here, so it can be very touristy.  The crime rate is high  as well.  Even though we have a security gate on our dock, we were told not to leave the premises after dark. Since the VAT tax has been added, the crime rate has gone up exponentially and so has the drug trafficking. McDonalds has 4 armed security guards between the entrance and the exit.  While walking around, we saw KFC, Dairy Queen, Dominos, Wendy’s, Starbucks, and McDonalds.  For lunch, however, we decided on a Bahamian rice/ mac n cheese/broccoli/ grilled salmon meal instead, at a small Whole Foods style market, and were not disappointed.  The lady behind the counter obviously thought we were starving, because she loaded us up (Ha,ha).  This phenomenal meal cost us under $20, including 2 lemonades.

Angie getting the fenders ready for dockside
Angie getting the fenders ready for dockside
Nassau Harbor
Nassau Harbor

The little bar at the marina serves Lionfish sliders and fish tacos.  However, Angie is positive it is not actual Lionfish being served.  The fillets are very thick and have both dark and light meat.  The Lionfish we saw looked more like it would have something smaller than a Bluegill filet.  We think they are just playing off the novelty of thinking you are actually eating Lionfish, and invasive Pacific Ocean species that is decimating the coral reefs in the Bahamas and Caribbean.  They have no natural predator in the Atlantic and breed like crazy, eating all of the small reef fish.  The Bahamas have Lionfish derbies to try to kill as many as you can. They ask you to kill them if you see them. However, the only one we saw was at Shroud Cay, inside the Park, which is a no kill zone. Their spikes are poisonous, so handling them is very dangerous, unless you know what you are doing.

 

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