Rudder Cay, Southern Exumas, Bahamas

Apr 8-9

The time has finally arrived to start heading out again. After a rocking and rolling time through the marina channel (there were very tall waves at the entrance), we were able to point north and put the sails up.  It felt good to be on the water again.  The sapphire blue of the Atlantic water is beautiful and Uno Mas feels so much better while under sail.

Another Boat while Underway
Another Boat while Underway
Rudder Cut
Rudder Cut

At Rudder Cay we anchored next to Belle Vie, Napoleon and Suzzane (and Porto, their dog) from Quebec.  They charter their Lagoon out and had 5 guests aboard. We had stingrays in the cove hanging around the boat.  Also, Sonjare came into the anchorage from Cat Island.  We had meds for Brida that were shipped to Colorado that we needed to give them.

Step 2 of the Coconut Process:  Get the water and meat out of it, without hacking off a digit or two. It took hours and a couple of oyster knives to chisel out the meat. We strained the coconut water through our French press coffee maker.

Machete - Don't know what could go wrong
Machete – Don’t know what could go wrong
Topped Coconut
Topped Coconut
Inside of coconut #1
Inside of coconut #1

Step 3 of the Coconut Process:  Clean the boat.

Deck Stain - Coconut Carnage
Deck Stain – Coconut Carnage

3 days later, the stain from the brown fibers is still present.  This is after trying barkeepers friend, dishsoap, and even acid to get the staining off.  No more hacking or storing of coconuts on the boat anymore….It needs to happen offsite! However, we did get a very full 1 gallon Ziploc baggie full of coconut meat.  Now, what to do with it?  We are putting it in everything.  Raw coconut does not have all of the sugar added to it that people usually associate with eating it.  Mark cannot stand the sweet stuff, and does not seem to mind the raw.  We have even tried pickling and marinating it, which turned out pretty tasty for an antipasta dish.

The snorkeling and diving around the anchorage cove was pretty good! There were a couple of caves to check out as well as the stainless steel piano and mermaid sculpture David Copperfield sunk in about 20 ft of water in the channel.

The Mermaid and Piano
The Mermaid and Piano
Cave #1
Cave #1
Inside Cave #1
Inside Cave #1
Sonjare in Cave #1
Sonjare in Cave #1

The current was kicking when we were trying to snorkel down to get pictures with the mermaid.

Angie Snorkeling
Angie Snorkeling
Red Starfish
Red Starfish
Dinghies at Cave #2
Dinghies at Cave #2
Yellow Spotted Stingray
Yellow Spotted Stingray

The most exciting “fish” we saw was a black tip reef shark. ( Our first shark!)  Other notable sightings include a tiny Spanish hogfish, yellow stingray, schools of snapper, awesome starfish, and  large barracuda.

The Angie Fish - A Fairy Basslet - about 2 inches long
The Angie Fish – A Fairy Basslet – about 2 inches long
Coral
Coral
More Coral
More Coral
Anemone #2
Anemone #2
Small Nassau Grouper
Small Nassau Grouper

The owners of Rudder Cay have security cameras in the trees at the beaches along with no trespassing signs.  In the Bahamas, private property lines end at the high water line on the beach. No one can kick you off, saying you are trespassing, as long as you stay on the beach.  However, some island owners like to have security guards and dogs patrol the areas.  In the Abacos, we never felt unwelcome, but in the Exumas, it now seems to be the norm on the private islands.

Mean Kitty Enjoying a Beer
Mean Kitty Enjoying a Beer
Screen Door Repair # ??? I am positive it will work this time...
Screen Door Repair # ??? Am positive it will work this time…

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