Departed the Abacos, Entered Eluethera, and Then, the Exumas

Mar 6-7

It happened! The seas died down to 3-5 feet and the wind was out of the S-SE, so we left around 6 AM and made the cut close to high tide. We were the first ones out of the anchorage. (THAT is a first, since Angie is NOT a morning person, especially 2 days in a row.)

A very calm cut
A very calm cut
Mark at Sun Up
Mark at Sun Up

It was slamming a bit, but that died down once we got away from land and into the Northeast Providence Channel.

Angie reworking the anchor bridle chaffe guards
Angie reworking the anchor bridle chafe guards

We had a few cargo ships pass within a mile and some fishing trawlers as company.

An 800 ft tanker that altered course for us - Gotta Love AIS
An 800 ft tanker that altered course for us – Gotta Love AIS

The question of the day was whether or not to risk going through Current Cut or head further West and go through Fleeming to get to the Exumas the next day. We had a nice barracuda hang out with us while we had dinner outside. We didn’t go ashore at Eleuthera. It was a long day underway and there will be another one the next.

Hello, Eleuthera!
Hello, Eleuthera!

Fleeming Channel won out, along with a 10 mile/2 hour detour, hopefully taking us around most of the Yellow Bank area in Exuma Bank. There are many shallow areas in the Bahamas with unmarked or uncharted coral heads that like to rip your keels off or hole your boat. We made it through without incident, but with a nervous Angie at lookout for most of the day. It was good to finally get to the Exumas!

Angie hiding from the sun
Angie hiding from the sun
Mark installing the code zero sail
Mark installing the code zero sail
Flying our Code Zero light wind sail (it is half of a spinnaker)
Flying our Code Zero light wind sail (it is half of a spinnaker)

The Allens Cay anchorage already had 5 masts sticking above the shoreline, so we went further South to Highbourne Cay. The prehistoric looking iguanas are going to have to wait until another time for Angie to take their photos. There were already 8 boats at Highbourne’s anchorage as well. So, we went a bit further south and tucked in between Oyster Cay’s Sister island and a “reef”. We maneuvered around a 210 ft pleasure boat and all of its toys. While waiting for sundown, the Highbourne anchorage ended up with over 20 boats in it. We are so glad we anchored away from everyone.

Good Morning, Everyone at Highbourne
Good Morning, Everyone at Highbourne

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